These Funny Bones


Our first anatomy lab exam is today and it is going to cover the Upper Limb bones specifically the clavicle, humerus and the scapula. 


I think this is what is going to happen today:


  • Be able to name all the listed bones and bone features 
  • Be able to differentiate between a right scapula and a left scapula
  • Be able to name all the listed bones and bone features of the humerus 
  • Be able to differentiate between a right humerus and a left humerus
  • Be able to identify the attachments
  • Be able to identify the orientation
  • Be able to identify the function

The tricky part here is identifying which is the left bone or the right bone.
I have my Clinical Anatomy book by Snell with me plus Netter's Atlas but everything seems unclear. I wanted more information because my brain is now numb. Luckily I chanced upon a site that deals with these funny bones . It was a treasure trove!


Clavicle

 Landmarks: 

    Diagram comparing and contrasting concave versus convex concepts with respect to mirrors and lenses.
  • medial 2/3 convex forward







  • lateral 1/3 concave outward













                       






Anterior view of right clavicle




1. acromial (lateral) end - more cylindrical, some say it is triangular

2. medial (sternal) end - flat









Scapula

In order to determine if a scapula is right or left, orient it so the glenoid fossa (articulating surface) faces laterally (outward) and the soine is posterior (toward the back) and superior (upper). The coracoid process should be superior and anterior.

Posterior view of left scapula




1) Acromion
2) Glenoid cavity
3) Lateral Angle
4) Lateral border
5) Inferior angle
6) Medial border
7) Infraspinous fossa
8) Spine of scapula
9) Supraspinous fossa
10) Superior angle












Anterior view of left scapula



1) Acromion
2) Glenoid cavity
3) Lateral angle
4) Lateral border
5) Inferior angle
6) Medial border
7-9) Post. view only
10) Superior angle
11) Coracoid process
12) Subscapular fossa
13) Suprascapular notch









Humerus

In order to distinguish right from left:
1. orient the bones so that the rounded head is superior (up) and pointing medially (toward the body's midline)
2. you will need to determine the anterior vs. posterior side; look for the deep olecranon fossa on the posterior side ( where the olecranon process of the ulna fits in when the elbow is straightened)



Anterior view of right humerus


1) Greater Tubercle
2) Lesser Tubercle
3) Deltoid Tuberosity
4) Radial fossa
5) Capitulum
6) Trochlea
7) Medial epicondyle
8) Coronoid fossa
9) Anatomical neck
10 Head of Humerus












Posterior View of the right humerus
1) Greater Tubercle
3) Deltoid Tuberosity
6) Trochlea
7) Medial epicondyle
9) Anatomical neck
10 Head of Humerus
11) Lateral epicondyle
12) Olecranon fossa




















I hope I can memorize all these before the sun rises on top of other things... Haaayyzzz med school is not that easy. God bless us all future MD's!



BTW here is an easy way to memorize the brachial plexus in 5 mins. Aja!





CONVERSATION

1 komentářů:

Back
to top